good intentions for 2015! also, a book review: playing the whore by melissa gira grant

Dear readers,

Thanks for your patience. I am so pleased to know you’re still interested in reading me after all these years, especially since I rarely post these days. I miss you, and I miss writing here. I plan to do more of it as my health improves in 2015. I also have some other big ideas, including a donation button and a few formatting revamps! Eventually.

For now, I’m going to be posting a series of book reviews. Instead of one big post like I did last year around this time, I’ll be posting them one at a time over the coming weeks in what I hope will be an entertaining trickle. I hope you enjoy them! I have every intention of writing posts that aren’t book reviews over the coming months – lest you be concerned. I already have a few topics in mind. Among others the film version of Those Damn Books will be coming out soon and doubtless I’ll have things to say about it. Sigh. Also I’m chewing on lots of ideas these days about relationship transitions, power and protocol, fetishism, and more. Perhaps some of them will find their way here.

For now, I give you the first in my short series of reviews. Read on, and stay tuned.

***

Playing the Whore: The Work of Sex Work by Melissa Gira Grant

Grant’s brief book takes a fresh look at sex work from an insider’s perspective. She does an admirable job articulating the politics of sex work without simply rehashing the same-old.

Especially strong is her chapter “The Police,” in which she explains in shockingly simple terms how feminist organizations collude with the state to produce a situation in which cops are able to perpetrate violence against sex workers freely and with impunity, proportionally far more so than the workers’ clients ever do.

In her chapter “The Prostitute,” she describes the social construction of the prostitute as a creature who is always seen as working (and therefore sexually available), and always needing to be controlled. In “The Work,” she decries a public that demands punishment for sex workers while also voraciously consuming their stories. She sees the prostitute’s storytelling about her own life as being itself a form of sex work, and one that Grant herself refuses to engage in within the pages of her book. Essentially, we’re not paying her for that kind of service. (Her framing of this is fucking brilliant.)

In “The Debate,” she notes that the internet, dating sites and social media are blurring the lines between the prostitute and the non-prostitute:

“Is this the real fear then: not that more people are becoming prostitutes but that the conventional ways we’d distinguish a prostitute from a nonprostitute woman are no longer as functional? Antiprostitution laws are primarily about exclusion and banishment; how, now, will we know who is to be banished and excluded?”

In “The Industry,” she takes on rescue-industry NGOs and feminist groups, arguing that these groups use sex workers to legitimize their own morality programs. In “The Other Women,” she critiques the black-and-white framing employed by anti-sex-work feminists:

“As controlled by customer demand as sex workers are supposed to be, anti-sex work reformers carry on far more about customers than sex workers do, insisting that they and their sexual demands are all-powerful. Sex workers are made helpless before them, their consent and critical thinking apparently eroded by their attire.”

She concludes with a clear call to decriminalization:

“There’s no reason to wait for all these attitudes to change, for whore stigma to somehow fall away, to make room for another way, whether that’s amending the law, ending sex workers’ status as outlaws by other means, or by something more and yet unimagined. To hope that all those others who are occupied by their obsession with us – by the prostitutes in their fantasies – to wait for them to change and accept sex work as work and sex workers as full agents in their own lives before we take the lead? They won’t. It’s through our demands, our imaginations, that we will.”

The book is somewhat disjointed – I wished for a clearer thesis. Grant often raises a topic or an example and doesn’t bring it to a satisfying conclusion. And yet, I wonder if that’s just me wishing for pat sum-ups where they simply don’t exist. Instead, Grant excels at insightful reframing, turning questions back against their askers and challenging the ways we understand what “prostitution” is and isn’t, who’s exploiting who, who’s perpetuating violence, who’s harming and who’s helping. Throughout, she never relies on the “party line” of progressive sex work politics, preferring instead to push even further, ask more complicated questions, never pretending to have a simple solution but always challenging the boring received ideas about sex work that circulate in our culture. This book is much-needed, frank, simple, and relentlessly intelligent.


One thought on “good intentions for 2015! also, a book review: playing the whore by melissa gira grant

  1. Glad to see you back even if it’s only in a limited form. I’ve been struggling with an issues of health and sanity over the last two years also. Nothing saps a person’s energy to write more than therapy and healing.

    I wish you well in all endeavors in 2015.
    Bob

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